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Growing dill.

Date: Wed, 3 Apr 1996 13:11:48 +0000
To: The Culinary Herbs & Spices List <HERBS.HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM>
From: Brian Williams <bwilliam.WESTMONT.ESU3.NE.US>
Subject: Question on growing dill

> Hi all! I am starting dill indoors right now, and it came up very leggy. It's about 3" high, well not really high since it's kind of drooped all over. Is this normal? It seems like it might have grown too fast?

Hi All,
I have grown dill inside and it does get very leggy. It is still fine to plant outside and it is very resiliant. I wouldn't worry about it. I would also throw out some seed when you plant your seedlings as this way you can have yound tender dill for longer periods of time throughout the summer. It is great as a merinade with italian dressing for chicken!


From: Esther Czekalski <E.Czekalski.M.BULL.COM>

> I am starting dill indoors right now, and it came up very leggy.

I've read that dill (like fennel) does not like to be disturbed so it's best to sow outside, right where they will grow. In my experience they do flop around a lot so I grow them with supports. I also find that they go to seed before I get a lot of green. There are newer varieties that stay short and don't go to seed as quickly; think I will try them next.


From: Laurie Otto <lotto.PTIALASKA.NET>

> I've read that dill (like fennel) does not like to be disturbed so

I think that disturbing plants has a lot to do with where you live. If I don't start dill, fennel, and nasturtiums (all of which have a reputation for not liking to be transplanted) inside, I only get to enjoy them at the very end of the season. I prefer getting them started inside, so that I can enjoy them early and through out the summer months. In our cool climate with long days, dill does very well (three years ago, my dill got to eight feet high, although normally it is about six feet). I like Dukat Leaf Dill from Shepards the best, although Tetris is another good selection. The trick is to just get them started inside so that they are about four inches high when you plant them out. Then make sure to religiously cut off every seed head as it appears. If you do this, you will have dill that last the summer. I find that if I plant the seeds directly outside that they plants are weaker, spindlier, and go to seet faster. BUT, as with all gardening advice, it's more reliable for people who live in similar climates. I find that the local Cooperative Extension Service office, and local Master Gardeners, give better advice that what you can read in books or get from people like me who live in dramatically different regions.


From: Esther Czekalski <E.Czekalski.M.BULL.COM>

>> I am starting dill indoors right now, and it came up very leggy.
> Well, Esther, is it too early to begin to sow dill seeds outside do you think?

Sorry if you've told us and I forgot, where are you? It is too early for me in zone 5/6, especially this year. I plant them about the same time I move the tomatos and basil out; it may be that's later than necessary. They shoot up pretty fast. Other opinions?

Esther


From: Joyce Schillen <gardenpg.CDSNET.NET>

> It is too early for me in zone 5/6, especially this year.

Hi all,

Dill is a hardy annual that can take some cold weather and frost. Most instructions say to plant it outdoors as soon as the soil can be worked. In my garden the volunteers start popping up about a month or so before our last frost.

About the leggy dill seedlings, is it possible they aren't getting enough light?


Culinary herb FAQ: http://www.henriettesherbal.com/faqs/culi-2-13-dill.html


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