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Strep B in pregnancy.

Problems:

From: HerbalSW.aol.com
Subject: [Herb] strep B and Pregnancy
To: herb.lists.ibiblio.org
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 14:13:19 EST

I just tested positive for Strep B and I am due to have a C-section in 10 days.

Can someone please tell me if echinacea is enough to address this? I am allergic to penicillin which they would normally give IV during the delivery but, in stead will give me a form of erythromycin.

Any thoughts and suggestions would be gratefully appreciated...

Catherine M. Wood, LCSW, CADC, ADS


From: "Kerry" jclarke1.mn.rr.com

Many women have found inserting garlic vaginally to be effective at keeping Strep colonization down. However, since you'll be giving birth via C/S, I'm not sure what the concern is. The concern is about the infant contracting the bacteria during the birth process and coming down with the infection. Since your baby will not be traveling your birth canal, I don't think the risk of GBS infection will be there.


From: Herbmednurse.aol.com

> I just tested positive for Strep B and I am due to have a C-section in 10 days.

Catherine;

while I love herbs for everything; when it comes to babies, I prefer to be safe than sorry.

Unfortunately, I didn't think this way 5 years ago. I had strep and didn't treat it allopathically (and I'm a nurse to boot!) and delivered 2 months prematurely. The strep isn't just a concern vaginally, but can travel up and cause problems intrauterine as well. I went on to develop a whopper of an infection, coupled with massive bleeding....well, it took 6 months of drugs, surgery, and misery to get over it all. I was febrile and in shock immediately before delivery, too. To statistics, my case was, more than likely, unique.

While - my - case may be unique; when it comes to pregnant moms, I wouldn't poo-poo things. To help put things in perspective, nearly 1/4 of pregnant women have strep colonized from their vaginas. The most common colonization rate in neonates is from 1-7%; and accounts for about 30% of neonatal infections. Moms experience about 1-2% of uterine infections; mainly due to AROM. (again, I was probably "unique")

Neonates who develop infections are assessed for pneumonias and/or septicemia immediately after birth; and complications of infections that produce meningitis for a week after birth.

Vag testing isn't necessarily recommended or reliable.

If I - wouldn't - have had that nasty experience; I may have opted for a better route than I had had through my midwife. I would have taken
Echinacea tincture 2 dropperfuls QID
Echinace infusion as a douche
- but only with the help/approval of my caregiver.

And, of course, berberine containing herbs are effective against strep. But berberine is a uterine stimulant. Oregon grape root may be as effective and safer during pregnancy. I'd check with my caregiver.

As far as the garlic; I've read much about its benefits when used intravaginally especially for trich. However, for every good story, I've heard nasty ones caused by inadvertently nicked garlic cloves that burned the *** out of the tender vaginal mucosa.

If one elects to use garlic, make sure that the cloves are not nicked at all.

Place the clove in a small piece of clean (unbleached) muslin that has a small piece of it 'hanging' to allow for easier removal.

Just a few notes to think about. Make sure you research everything out first. Good luck to you - and congratulations!!

d


From: Rena Henson rena1695.yahoo.com

Catherine,

I have done a lot of research on pregnancy and childbirth, and I understand that these tests often have false-positive result. Maybe a second would be in order just to be sure you really have it.



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