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Hemochromatosis.

Not all adult-onset diabetes is adult-onset diabetes.

A lady called me a few weeks ago, asking what herbs she should take for adult-onset diabetes. She specifically asked for herbs to curb sugar production in the liver.

I dropped into the nearest chair and exclaimed: "That approach is utterly and completely wrong!"

She asked why. I explained that if you curb your liver's sugar production your liver will get damaged, sooner or later. Which is why all those type II diabetics (= adult-onset diabetes) (= the one where you ingest too much sugar and high-glycemic index foods and have done so for years, which means that your pancreas makes loads of insulin), who pop their pills faithfully, will have to switch sooner or later, to something else. Which will damage something else.

The only appropriate way to address adult-onset diabetes is to bloody stop the bloody carbs already. And the sugar. More on this in the syndrome x series ...

... anyway, she then said that yes, she's been on a low-carb diet for the last few years, because she didn't want to pop pills.

Woot.

Had she said "yes, but the low-carb diet is so difficult", which quite a lot of type II'ers do, I'd have hung up on her.

As is, I listened to her story. Her doc had told her that she had adult-onset diabetes. Now, docs should remember that their patients really are interested in their own health, and that they're experts in their particular complaints. This lady had done quite a bit of research into the why of things, because she didn't feel that she was a syndrome x'er. And so she insisted that the doc do a blood test, going for iron levels. Which came back as being through the roof.

The doc still told her that her diabetes was adult onset, even after he'd found out that hemochromatosis, that is, too much iron in the blood, caused insulin-producing cells to shut down in the pancreas.

Adult onset, my tiny hiney.

The iron also damages the liver, is responsible for arthritis-like symptoms, can cause early menopause, and can cause hypothyroid symptoms.
A few of which are confusingly like syndrome x symptoms...
... anyway, any diabetes where the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin is type I (= juvenile-onset diabetes), nevermind that this lady was way past menopause. And sooner or later, when insulin production stops altogether, she's in for insulin shots.

The problem is genetical: if both parents carry a gene that says "let's store lots of iron" their kid gets an iron overload, come adulthood. Men don't bleed, so they get problems in their late 20s or early 30s. Ladies bleed about 1 dl of blood every month, so they get problems 5-10 years after menopause. After they stop bleeding.

There's a very easy cure: go give blood every few months. Now, post-menopausal ladies' blood isn't accepted by the local blood services, cos the lady is too old. Bother, eh? There's a tradition of cupping up here. And some of the cuppers (or whatever they call themselves) do blood cupping. Which of course isn't as sterile etc. as formal blood services, but hey, if that's the only way you can get rid of excess iron, that's what you have to do.

Also do liver herbs, go for low-carb (that'll make your insulin last you longer), exercise more (that'll shoo in blood sugar without the need for insulin: that's needed elsewhere).

Genetic hemochromatosis is surprisingly common, at least in Finland. Other people are affected too - I remember hearing that Russians carry the gene, as do Scots. I think. And a few others.

--

There are non-hereditary hemochromatosises as well. If you ingest red meat with vitamin C you'll get loaded with iron. Drop the vitamin C when you eat red meat. Eat far less red meat. Avoid red wine as well. Do dairy with your iron-rich foods. Do tea with your iron-rich foods. Go for the advice for anemiacs and do exactly the opposite.

Luck!

Comments

I have hemochromatosis I also have PKD or Polycystic Kidney Disease, most doctors don't even know what these conditions are let alone how to treat them - the most insulting part is when I'm asked "so how do you know that?" Well a doctor drew some blood did some tests, some of which were genetic and well... this is typically followed by a response of "well taht can't possibly be right"

I find the connection between insulin and hemochromatosis to be quite interesting as diabetes and thyroid issues are rampent on my dad's side of the family, it makes total sense now as they are type II and the women suddenly became diabetics after having hystorectomies! I used to give blood but after a bout of hep A, from eating out and I got E-coli from eating out as well, I'm no longer able to donate. I've considered leaches as an alternative, I just need to get past the squeemish factor first.

Syndrome X is considered a fictious disease here in the states (midwest) as is PCOD by mainstream doctors. When I asked my doctor about it I was told that it was a made up disease by the alternatives.

Btw thank you for the info on herb bundles for the sauna, I find the dry heat really helps my aching bones a lot. I'm assuming that river birch would work well, you mentioned birch bundles as you didn't say which spp of birch.

Leeches are a good idea. There used to be lots of them in Finnish lakes and along Finnish seashores, but they've disappeared over the last 30 years, dunno why.

I know that leeches are still around as I think they are researching the anti-clotting factors they use. Someone must be raisiing them for this.
There is a book that I can't remember the name of that talks about weird medcial stuff like leeches and maggots to clean up putrid wounds. I think a local university or librarian might be able help find the scientific name of the species used. I'm gonna look too.
I am glad to know about hemochromatosis!

I just wanted to say that drinking tea inhibits iron absorbtion. So does coffee as it's the tannins. =^D

Most herbal teas do not contain tannin. Dark teas such as oolong and 'Green Tea' do have it.

Personally I like to make a bunch of green tea, decaf of course, put it in the fridge, and drink a bit with every meal.

If it wasn't decaf I would be up all night. The tea with the tannin will slow down your iron absorbtion and is all around good for ya.

Watch your vitamin C intake. Vitamin C will help move the iron around to your organs and we don't want that.

I heard from my dietician, that calcium slows down iron absorbtion too. So a little cottage cheese with meals may help.

Make sure your vitamins don't have iron or vitamin C.

You should not drink any high vitamin C juices at least 3 hours before or after a meal.

Hemochromatosis sufferers are 32% more likely to have a stroke. I don't know who came up with that number. But I like to take Omega3 fatty acids. A little stroke and heart attack prevention can't hurt.

Drink lots of water to help keep your blood thin. Parting words:

Red Meat is packed with iron. So watch it.

More about leeches and other slimy things. Maggots are now used routinely in UK hospitals and nursing homes to debride (ie remove dead tissue from) sloughing and necrotic wounds. They come neatly packaged in little dressing packs, which are applied and left in place for a couple of days for the little creatures to do their stuff. They have consistently proved superior to the kind of 'disinfecting' chemicals which were used previously, and can even clean out sinuses (tracks through tissues) as they crawl into them, munching as they go. They only eat dead tissue, not living, so don't do any damage at all to healthy healing tissues. Patients report that the only sensation is a slight tickling feeling. Leeching is also making a comeback, and is being used experimentally for haemachromatosis. All this is in the book 'Honey, Mud and Maggots' (sorry can't remember author) which I think is the one a previous commenter meant.

Thanks for that, Alison!

I ALSO HAVE HEMOCHROMATOSIS (SINCE AGE 10, I'VE BEEN TOLD I HAVE TO MUCH BLOOD AND IRON, NOW ALSO TO MUCH PROTEIN,BIG WHOP!).. AFTER GETTING THE RUN AROUND FROM DOCTORS, PLATELET DONATION CENTERS ETC.
I ALSO HAVE VERY VERY SMALL VEINS...EVEN IF THEY PUT IN A PERMANENT PORT THIS COULD BE VERY HARMFUL AND THE BLOOD WOULD NOT COME OUT AS FAST AS "REGULAR" FOLKS...AGAIN BIG WHOP!
I BUY MY "MEDICAL LEECHES" AND USE MYSELF..(THEY WERE USED ON ME WHEN I WAS YOUNG, SINCE NOTHING TO "THEIR" KNOWLEDGE" WAS AVAILABLE...
I BUY THEM FROM A CERTIFIED LEECHES FOR CLINICAL PURPOSES "HIRUDO-MED"....NOW IF YOU HAVE NOT EXPERIENCE BLOODLETTING BY LEECHES, PLEASE READ UP ON THIS METHOD
AND/OR BUY BOOK(s) TO TELL YOU HOW TO PLACE AND MEASURE YOUR PHLEBOTOMY AND HOW TO TEST THE TEMPERATURE OF THE SKIN WHERE LEECHES ARE(VERY IMPORTANT)
AND HOW TO CHECK YOUR HEMOGLOBIN (VERY VERY VERY IMPORTANT)
GOOD LUCK...
J.J.

thanks for that, J.J.!



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