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Salvia.

Botanical name:

The leaves of Salvia officinalis, Linné (Nat. Ord. Labiateae). A native of Europe, but cultivated extensively in kitchen gardens. Dose, 5 to 30 grains.
Common Names: Sage, Garden Sage.

Principal Constituents.—An aromatic, volatile oil (oil of sage), the chief principle of which is thujone (50 per cent).
Preparation.—1. Tinctura Salviae, Tincture of Sage (Sage, 8 ounces; Alcohol (76 per cent), 16 fluidounces). Dose, 1 to 60 drops.
2. Infusum Salviae, Infusion of Sage (1/2 ounce to Water, 16 fluidounces). Dose, 1 to 4 fluidounces.
Specific Indications.—Skin soft and relaxed; extremities cold and circulation feeble; urine of low specific gravity; colliquative sweating.

Action and Therapy.—Sage is a feeble tonic, astringent, and diaphoretic. The infusion provides a good gargle for ulcerated and inflamed throat and for relaxation of the uvula. Taken warm, it produces free sweating, while cold sage tea, by strengthening the cutaneous functions, restrains excessive sweating, and for this purpose is highly valued in phthisis and other wasting diseases. It acts best when the skin is soft and relaxed, the extremities cold, and the circulation weak. It is of considerable value in gastric debility with flatulence and has proved a good tonic in spermatorrhea. A good indication for salvia is urine of low specific gravity.


The Eclectic Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1922, was written by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D.



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