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Mucilago Chondri (N. F.)—Mucilage of Irish Moss.

Related entry: Chondrus (U. S. P.)—Chondrus

Preparation.—"Irish moss, thirty grammes (30 Gm.) [1 oz. av., 25 grs.]; water, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Wash the Irish moss with cold water, then place it in a suitable vessel, add one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏] of water, and heat it, on a boiling water-bath, for 15 minutes, frequently stirring. Then strain it through muslin, and pass enough water through the strainer to make the liquid, when cold, measure one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Mucilage of Irish moss may also be prepared in the following manner: Irish moss gelatin (F. 184), twenty grammes (20 Gm.) [309 grs.]; water, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Heat the Irish moss gelatin with one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏] of water, at a boiling temperature, until it is completely dissolved. Then allow the solution to cool, and add enough water, if necessary, to make up the volume to one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Note.—Mucilage of Irish moss, thus prepared, is well adapted for the preparation of emulsions of fixed oils. If it is, however, required for admixture with clear liquids, it should be diluted, when freshly made, and while still hot, with about 3 volumes of boiling water, filtered, and the filtrate evaporated to the volume corresponding to the proportions above given. The filtration may be greatly facilitated by filling the filter loosely with absorbent cotton, and pouring the liquid upon the latter.

"Mucilage of Irish moss may be preserved for some time by transferring it, while hot, into bottles, which should be filled to the neck, then pouring a layer of olive oil on top, securely stoppering the bottles, and keeping them, in an upright position, in a cool place. When the mucilage is wanted for use, the layer of oil may be removed by means of absorbent cotton"—(Nat. Form.).

Medical Uses.—(See Chondrus.)


King's American Dispensatory, 1898, was written by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D., and John Uri Lloyd, Phr. M., Ph. D.



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