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Tinctura Lobeliae (U. S. P.)—Tincture of Lobelia.

Botanical name:

Related entry: Lobelia (U. S. P.)—Lobelia

Preparation.—"Lobelia, in No. 40 powder, two hundred grammes (200 Gm.) [7 ozs. av., 24 grs.]; diluted alcohol, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Moisten the powder with two hundred cubic centimeters (200 Cc.) [6 fl℥, 366♏] of diluted alcohol, and macerate for 24 hours; then pack it firmly in a cylindrical percolator, and gradually pour diluted alcohol upon it, until one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏] of tincture are obtained"—(U. S. P.). Tincture of lobelia has the characteristic acrid and bitterish taste of lobelia, and a somewhat heavy odor. It is of a greenish-brown color.

Action, Medical Uses, and Dosage.—This tincture possesses the same properties as lobelia; the dose is from 30 to 60 drops as a nauseant; and 1/2 fluid ounce, or more, as an emetic. A tincture prepared of equal parts of vinegar and alcohol, instead of diluted alcohol, is preferable to the above, in cases where it is not to be kept for a length of time. Externally, the tincture of lobelia is beneficial as a local application in erysipelas, tetter, and similar cutaneous eruptions, stings of insects, and in the poisoning by rhus, having been successfully used by our practitioners in these affections, for more than 60 years past (J. King).

Related Tincture.—TINCTURA LOBELIAE ETHEREA, Ethereal tincture of lobelia. "Take of lobelia, in No. 40 powder, 4 ounces (Imp.); spirit of ether, a sufficient quantity. Moisten the powder with 2 fluid ounces of spirit of ether, and complete the percolation process. The resulting tincture should measure 1 pint. Dose, 5 to 15 minims. This preparation is made with rather more than 1 1/2 times the proportion of lobelia ordered for the corresponding preparation in the British Pharmacopoeia of 1885"—(Br. Pharm., 1898).


King's American Dispensatory, 1898, was written by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D., and John Uri Lloyd, Phr. M., Ph. D.



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