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Lotiones.—Lotions.

Preparations:

Other tomes: BPC

SYNONYM: Washes.

These comprise all compounds used as external washes and collyria, in which vegetable or mineral substances are dissolved in water or spirits, but which do not strictly class with infusions, liniments, mixtures, or tinctures. Water is most often used in preparing them.

Glycerin has been proposed as a vehicle for forming lotions with salts of alkaloids, thus:

  1. Morphine Lotion.—Take of acetate of morphine, 3 grains; glycerin, 5 drachms (troy); dissolve.
  2. Strychnine Lotion.—Take of sulphate of strychnine, 6 grains; glycerin, 5 drachms (troy). Dissolve the salt in the glycerin in a porcelain mortar. A teaspoonful of this lotion is applied by friction in paralysis of the limbs, on the vertebral column in chorea, and on the temple in certain cases of amaurosis.
  3. Veratrine Lotion.—Take of veratrine, 15 grains; glycerin, 5 drachms; diluted hydrochloric acid, a sufficient quantity; dissolve. A teaspoonful, applied by friction in chronic rheumatic pains of the joints, or in the sacro-lumbar region to relieve painful menstruation.
  4. Atropine Lotion.—Take of atropine, 6 grains; glycerin, 2 1/2 drachms; diluted hydrochloric acid, a sufficient quantity. Dissolve and mix. Forty or 50 drops, 3 times a day, rubbed on the track of the infra- and supra-orbital nerves, on that of the facial nerve, etc.

Liquid preparations in which glycerin forms a large portion of the menstruum, are termed "Glycerites," Glyceroles, or Glycerin Solutions (see Glycerites, Ointments, and Plasmae).

Other Lotions.—Two mercurial lotions, not employed, however, by Eclectics, are official in the British Pharmacopoeia. They are also found in the National Formulary from which we reproduce them as follows:

LOTIO FLAVA (N. F.), Yellow lotion, Yellow wash, Aqua phagedaenica flava.—"Corrosive chloride of mercury, three grammes (3 Gm.) [46 grains]; boiling water, solution of lime (U. S. P.), of each, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Dissolve the corrosive chloride of mercury in thirty-five cubic centimeters (35 Cc.) [1 fl℥, 88♏] of boiling water, and add the solution to a sufficient quantity of solution of lime to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. This mixture should be well agitated whenever any of it is to be dispensed"—(Nat. Form.).

LOTIO NIGRA (N. F.), Black lotion, Black wash, Aqua phagedaenica nigra.—"Mild chloride of mercury, seven and one-half grammes (7.5 Gm.) [116 grs.]; water, solution of lime (U. S. P.), of each, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Triturate the wild chloride of mercury with thirty-five cubic centimeters (35 Cc.) [1 fl℥, 88♏] of water, and gradually add a sufficient quantity of solution of lime to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. This mixture should be well agitated whenever any of it is to be dispensed"—(Nat. Form.). Other lotions are:

LOTIO ADSTRINGENS (N. F.), Astringent lotion, Warren's styptic, Styptic balsam.—"Sulphuric acid (U. S. P.), thirty-eight cubic centimeters (38 Cc.) [1 fl℥, 137♏]; oil of turpentine, thirty-one cubic centimeters (31 Cc.) [503♏]; alcohol, thirty-one cubic centimeters (31 Cc.) [503♏]. To the sulphuric acid, contained in a wedgewood mortar, slowly add the oil of turpentine, in small portions at a time, constantly stirring. Allow the mixture to cool, then add the alcohol cautiously, in the same manner, and continue stirring until no more fumes arise. When the liquid is cold, pour it into a glass-stoppered bottle. Note.—In preparing this mixture caution should be used so that the temperature may not rise too high. Particular care is to be observed if a larger quantity of this mixture is to be prepared. In this case it is preferable to prepare it in several portions"—(Nat. Form). This preparation, under the name Styptic Balsam, was a favorite with the early Eclectic physicians.

LOTIO PLUMBI ET OPII (N. F.), Lotion of lead and opium, Lead and opium wash.—"Lead acetate, seventeen and one-half grammes (17.5 Gm.) [270 grs.]; tincture of opium (U. S. P.), thirty-five cubic centimeters (35 Cc.) [1 fl℥, 88♏]; water, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Dissolve the lead acetate in about six hundred and fifty cubic centimeters (650 Cc.) [21 fl℥, 470♏] of water, add the tincture of opium and enough water to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. This mixture should be well agitated whenever any of it is to be dispensed"—(Nat. Form.).


King's American Dispensatory, 1898, was written by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D., and John Uri Lloyd, Phr. M., Ph. D.



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