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Iris.

Iris cristata Ait. Irideae. Crested Iris.

Mountains of Virginia and southward. Pursh says the root, when chewed, at first occasions a pleasant, sweet taste, which, in a few minutes, turns to a burning sensation by far more pungent than capsicum. The hunters of Virginia use it very frequently to alleviate thirst.

Iris ensata Thunb. Sword-Leaved Iris.

Himalayas and northern Asia. This iris is cultivated in Japan for the rootstocks, which furnish starch.

Iris japonica Thunb.

Japan. This species is grown in Japan and is used for the same purpose as I. ensata.

Iris pseudacorus Linn. Yellow Iris.

Eastern Asia and Europe. The angular seeds, when ripe, are said to form a good substitute for coffee but must be well roasted before eating.

Iris setosa Pall.

Siberia. This species is grown in Japan and is used for the same purpose as I. ensata.

Iris sibirica Linn. Siberian Iris.

Europe and northern Asia. This species is grown in Japan and is used for the same purpose as I. ensata.

Iris sisyrinchium Linn. Spanish Nut.

Mediterranean, the Orient and Afghanistan. This species has been in cultivation in England since the time of Gerarde, who calls it Spanish nut and says that it is "eaten at the tables of rich and delicious persons in sallads or otherwise." It is a native of the Mediterranean region.

Iris tectorum Maxim. Wall Iris.

Japan. This species is grown in Japan and is used for the same purpose as I. ensata.


Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World, 1919, was edited by U. P. Hedrick.



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