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Polygonum multiflorum (he shou wu).

Date: Tue, 4 Oct 1994 00:30:05 -0700
Sender: Medicinal and Aromatic Plants discussion list <HERB.TREARN.BITNET>
From: Mitchell Bebel Stargrove <mitch.TELEPORT.COM>
Subject: Re: Shou Wu Chih

>A friend of a friend is raving about "Shou Wu Chih" juice in ginseng tea, as an energy booster. I am interested to see if anyone on the HERB list is familiar with the product.

This is a form of HoShouWu - Polygonum multiflorum, good grocery store tonic


From: Dana Bama <DBAMA.CITE.ESUSDA.GOV>

Regarding Shou Wu Chih. I've tried it on several occasions. Other than an energy booster I've not noticed any other side affects. I noticed one other list member mentioned that it's used or recommended for males. I'm a woman and have had basically that same effect -- extra energy.

Dan


From: Rob Bidleman <robbee.CRL.COM>

> Regarding Shou Wu Chih.

** The name is actually Ho Shou Wu. SHOU WU refers to the plant and CHIH
refers to the alcohol-laden preparation. Besides alcohol, there are many other herbs in the tincture. Chinese herbs are actually <at times> a bit dangerous compared to our standards. Many are not regulated as far as content. The closest thing to a Chinese pharmacopiea states that it is good for keeping the hair black and sugar imbalances as well as being a liver tonic. There have also been claims it is a gonadotropic, it closes with "not recommended for women".

Rob


From: David Coomler <davidco.NETHOST.MULTNOMAH.LIB.OR.US>

On Tue, 4 Oct 1994, Rob Bidleman wrote:
> On Tue, 4 Oct 1994, Barry Caplin wrote:
> > You won't find the name Shou Wu Chih in any herb book.
> ** That of course depends on what books you are using, I don't have a book on Chinese herbs that doesn't list Shou Wu Chih as a common herb. The root is used and it has differring actions raw and when cooked.

I think this herb is probably what the Cantonese call Sau Wu--Polygonum multiflorum Thumb., and it is used, among other things, for preventing hair loss and even for increasing hair growth (all over, so watch it!). It is widely used in Chinese herbal medicine.

David


From: Eagle <eagle.NETCOM.COM>

"Shou Wu Chih" is not a single herb. It is an herbal liquor. The primary herb is indeed Ho shou wu, but this product does contain other herbs/substances. It is a chinese patent medication/liquor that is said "to strength kidney and liver". It is a reasonably good product and does have a pleasant taste.


From: Barbara Ross <ae553.LAFN.ORG>

In "Herbal Emissaries" by Steven Foster & Yue Chongxi (ISBN 0-89281-349-0) it's listed as a major chinese medicinal herb.

Chinese names: Pinyin: He-shou-wu root
Shou-wu-teng stems
He-shou-wu-ye leaves
Wade-Giles: Ho-shou-wu root
Shou-wu-teng stems

Botanical name Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. Family polygonaceae, not not to be confused with Polygonatum multiflorum of the lily family.

From this resource I find no warning that women should not take this herb. Only warning given is for unprocessed root!

The authors state that on the American herb market it is known as fo-ti and it is called hashuu in Japan.

Barbara


From: David Coomler <davidco.NETHOST.MULTNOMAH.LIB.OR.US>

> From this resource I find no warning that women should not take this herb. Only warning given is for unprocessed root!

Some may not recommend women taking Ho shou wu because Chinese herbalists say it causes hair growth, in undesired as well as desired areas.

David


From: Rob Bidleman <robbee.CRL.COM>

> Some may not recommend women taking Ho shou wu because Chinese herbalists say it causes hair growth, in undesired as well as desired areas.

** Right, the absence of a warning shouldn't supercede a warning from another source. Both Pang's and Hyatt's books mention hair growth. Pang says further "Not to be taken by women after menopause or during pregnancy..." The hair growth would be a personal choice I guess. The flat, sliced brownish root that is the most prevalent form of Fo-Ti has been boiled in a black bean broth to give it the much valued but false, dark brown color. God knows what is boiled OUT of the root in the process. I had to scour San Francisco to find a source of semi-fresh root.

Rob



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