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Herniated disk, BF & C formula.

Margaret Maurer, Jonathan Treasure, Kimberly Long, Rusty Taylor, Feb 1996, herblist


Date: Fri, 2 Feb 1996 11:43:53 EST
Sender: HERB.TREARNPC.EGE.EDU.TR
From: Jane Haskell-Cowles <janehc.UMCE.UMEXT.MAINE.EDU>
Subject: herniated disc

Hello, all, this is my first time out with a question ... my brother has a herniated disc, lower portion of the back. Any thoughts how he can keep the agonizing pain under control? He has recently taken an oral steroid and seems bent on going in that direction. He has problems sitting, standing for long periods, has numbness in one leg and foot and is almost at wits end. thanks, jane


From: Margaret Maurer <aa686.FREENET.AKRON.OH.US>

Swim. Exercise is the best way he can strengthen his back. If he can't swim, walk.

Use a lower lumbar support pillow in bed at night and when you drive.

Do your exercises

I suffered from back pain for 18 months after an automobile accident. There is light at the end of the tunnel - you can heal without surgery, etc.

My thoughts are with him.


From: jonathan treasure <jonno.TELEPORT.COM>

regarding various advice on herniated discs:

it is usual today to have an MRI to discover whether a disc is ruptured or herniated. This is useful. some herniation can be gradually accommodated by gentle osteopathic soft tissue manipulation (NOT chiropractic which should be avoided in these cases it is far too traumatic an approach) and strengthening exercises coupled with avoidance of adverse movements, lifting etc.

rupture, particularly if compressing a nerve, is exceedingly painful and there are grounds for considering surgery which has improved immeasurably since the "kipper" days, and uses semi-keyhole techniques to remove the cartilage compressing the nerve. 10 years ago the op had a very bad prognosis - it is less bad these days. the indication is probable nerve damage.

to be honest, herbs won't help much except for topical arnica oil/gaultheria oil massage around the affected parts. if the pain is tolerable in the short term, best to think in terms of trying to improve without surgery for say 6 months - then review the situation.

bad nerve pain can be helped with cannabis by the way....

jonathan


From: Kimberly Long <klong.SPIRALNET.COM>

> [...] rupture, particularly if compressing a nerve, is exceedingly painful and there are grounds for considering surgery which has improved immeasurably since the "kipper" days, and uses semi-keyhole techniques to remove the cartilage compressing the nerve. 10 years ago the op had a very bad prognosis - it is less bad these days. the indication is probable nerve damage.

As one that had 3 ruptured discs that were compresssing several nerves, I can definitly state that sometimes surgery is the best answer. I had the cartilage removed as Jonathan describes above and I tell you, within 3 days of the surgery I felt like a new person. Post-op, one must still get involved in an excercise routine in order to maintain strength and flexibility.

> it is usual today to have an MRI to discover whether a disc is ruptured or herniated. This is useful. some herniation can be gradually accommodated by gentle osteopathic soft tissue manipulation ( NOT chiropractic which should be avoided in these cases it is far too traumatic an approach) and strengthening exercises coupled with avoidance of adverse movements, lifting etc.

An interesting side note. Prior to surgery, I spent many months having tests done trying to determine if the problem could be solved without surgery. My symptoms were not corresponding with what was thought to have been the discs that were ruptured. Well, we finally did an MRI and found that I actually have an extra vertebra. This set everything off by one disc placement.

Anyway, I urge anyone with severe symptoms to get several medical opinions along with a full MRI series before deciding the course of treatment.


From: Rosamond -Rusty- Taylor <rtaylor.OLYMPIC.NET>

>my brother has a herniated disc, lower portion of the back. Any

(snip)
Personally, I would use a formula developed by Dr. John Christopher, called BF & C (bone, flesh & cartilage). I would buy (or make up) the powdered form by the pound, and make fomentations of it, leaving them on all night, and much of
the day, 6 days a week, for several weeks, at least.
(snip)

Formula for BF&C (from "School of Natural Healing" by Dr. John R. Christopher):

6 parts Oak bark (Quercus species)
3 parts Marshmallow root (Althaea officinalis)
3 parts Mullein herb (Verbascum thapsus)
2 parts Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium)
1 part Lobelia (Lobelia inflata)
1 part Skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora)
6 parts Comfrey root (Symphytum officinale)
3 parts Walnut bark or leaves (Juglans nigra)
3 parts Gravel root (Eupatorium purpureum)



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