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List of Abbreviations.

List of Abbreviations used in the British Pharmaceutical Codex. 1911

B.P. = British Pharmacopoeia.
B.P.C. = British Pharmaceutical Codex.
B.P. Conf. F. = British Pharmaceutical Conference Unofficial Formulary, 1901.
C.F. = Canadian Formulary of Unofficial Preparations, 1900.
Ed.Ph. = Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia, 1841.
G.F. = Glasgow and West of Scotland Formulary, 1908.
I.C.A. = Indian and Colonial Addendum (1900) to the British Pharmacopoeia, 1898.
N.F. = National Formulary of Unofficial Preparations, 1906.
N.O. = Natural Order.
Ph.D. = Pharmacopoea Dublinensis, 1850.
Ph.Fr. = Pharmacopoea Française, 1908.
Ph.G. = Pharmacopoea Germanica, 1900.
P. I. = Prescriptio Internationalis of the Brussels Conference for the Unification of Pharmacopoeial Formulas for Potent Drugs, 1902.
P. L. = Pharmacopoea Londinensis, 1851.
S.G. = Specific Gravity.
Syn. = Synonym.
U.S.P. = Pharmacopoeia of the United States of America, 1900.
w/v = Weight in Volume.

NOTE.—The abbreviations used in the Pharmacological and Therapeutic Index should be self-explanatory to prescribers and dispensers.

SPECIAL NOTICE

All liquids should be measured in preparing medicines, unless the contrary is specifically indicated, and it must be understood that figures in the Codex, representing quantities of liquids, denote parts by volume, except in cases where the words" by weight" accompany the figures. The equivalents given after chemical formulae are based upon International Atomic Weights (1911); all temperatures are stated in degrees Centigrade; specific gravities are to be determined at 15.5° C. unless otherwise specified. "Alcohol" means "Alcohol (90 per cent.)." Where the term "water-bath" is used, it is intended that the temperature shall not exceed 100° C.; "ordinary temperature" means at or about 15.5° C.; the numbers distinguishing the degrees of fineness of powders indicate the number of meshes to a linear inch of the sieve through which the powder will pass.


The British Pharmaceutical Codex, 1911, was published by direction of the Council of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.



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