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Syrupus Aurantii (U. S. P.)—Syrup of Orange.

Botanical name:

Related entry: Aurantii Dulcis Cortex (U. S. P.)—Sweet Orange Peel

SYNONYM: Syrup of orange peel.

Preparation.—"Sweet orange peel, taken from the fresh fruit, fifty grammes (50 Gm.) [1 oz. av., 334 grs.]; precipitated calcium phosphate, fifty grammes (50 Gm.) [1 oz. av., 334 grs.]; sugar, seven hundred grammes (700 Gm.) [1 lb. av., 8 ozs., 303 grs.]; alcohol, water, each, a sufficient quantity to make one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Introduce the sweet orange peel (which should be as free as possible from the white, inner layer, and cut into small shreds) into a flask, and add eighty cubic centimeters (80 Cc.) [2 fl℥, 339♏] of alcohol. Stopper the flask loosely with a notched cork, and apply the heat of a water-bath until the alcohol boils, and maintain it boiling during 5 minutes. Then stopper the flask well, and set it aside to cool. Filter off the liquid, and wash the filter and contents with alcohol until the filtrate measures one hundred cubic centimeters (100 Cc.) [3 fl℥, 183♏]. Mix the precipitated calcium phosphate in a mortar, with one hundred and fifty grammes (150 Gm.) [5 ozs. av., 127 grs.] of sugar, and add the tincture with constant trituration. To the resulting, pasty mass add three hundred cubic centimeters (300 Cc.) [10 fl℥, 69♏] of water, triturating constantly, transfer the whole to a filter, and return the first portions of the filtrate, if necessary, until it runs through clear. In the filtrate dissolve the remainder of the sugar, and add enough water, through the filter, to make the product measure one thousand cubic centimeters (1000 Cc.) [33 fl℥, 391♏]. Mix thoroughly"—(U. S. P.).

Pharmaceutical Uses.—This syrup is agreeable in flavor and odor, and has a yellowish color. The volatile oil of the fresh, sweet orange peel, together with coloring matter, is dissolved by the alcohol. It is an excellent flavoring substance for mixtures.


King's American Dispensatory, 1898, was written by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D., and John Uri Lloyd, Phr. M., Ph. D.



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