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Malpighia.

Malpighia angustifolia Linn. Malpighiaceae

West Indies. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia aquifolia Linn.

West Indies. The fruit is dark purple when ripe and is edible.

Malpighia berteriana Spreng.

Guadeloupe. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia cnide Spreng.

Santo Domingo. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia coccigera Linn.

West Indies. The fruit is small, purple in color when ripe and is edible.

Malpighia emarginata Moc. & Sesse

Mexico. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia fucata Ker.-Gawl.

Jamaica. The berries are edible.

Malpighia glabra Linn. Barbados Cherry.

Tropical America. This tree is planted in most gardens in Jamaica and is cultivated for its fruit in tropical America. The fruit is round, red, of the bigness of a cherry, smooth skinned, and contains, within a reddish, sweetish, copiously juicy pulp, several triangular stones whose sides are so accommodated to one another as to seem to make one round one with several furrows on the outside. The fruit, says Schomburgk, is much used in Barbados in preserves and tarts and the taste reminds one of the raspberry rather than the cherry.

Malpighia grandiflora Jacq.

Martinique. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia incana Mill.

Honduras. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia macrophylla Willd.

Brazil. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia nitida Crantz.

Venezuela. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia obovata H. B. & K.

New Granada. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia punicifolia Linn.

Tropical America. The fruit is one of the size and shape of a cherry, very succulent, and of a pleasant, acid flavor, says Don. Lunan says it makes very agreeable tarts and excellent jellies.

Malpighia saccharina G. Don. Sugar Plum.

Tropical Africa. The fruit is sold in great quantities in the market of Freetown.

Malpighia setosa Spreng.

West Indies. The fruit is edible.

Malpighia urens Linn. Cow-Itch Cherry.

West Indies. The fruit, says Don, is insipid and is eaten only by children and negroes.


Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World, 1919, was edited by U. P. Hedrick.



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