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This is a page to be proofread from Salmon's Botanologia, 1710.


almost of the opinion that the Black Beet of the Ancients was that we now call Our Red Beets: but Modern Authors have found out several other Kinds. As, 1. Beta vindis Communis, The Common Green Beet. 2. Beta alba, called also Candida & Pallef-cens, The White Beet. 7. Beta rubra noftra, called also nigra, &" rubra vulgatior, The Red Beet. 4. Beta rubra, called also, Beta Romana, Beta rubra Rapt radice, Rapum Rubrum, Rapum fativum Ru-brum, Beta nigra Romana, Beta erythrorrhizos, by Lugduncnfis, The Roman Red Beet. 5. BetaCreti-ca fpinofa, Prickly Beets of Candia. 6. Beta Syl-vc/fris maritima, Sea Beets. 7. Beta Lucia Syriaca, Yellow Beets. 8. Beta platicaulos, Beta Cofta lata, alba Lutea, a urea, ruber rim a, Italic a, ficula, The yellow or flat Stalk'd Beet. Of all which Kinds we (hall only Tieat of the first Four in this Book, as being only proper for thispurpofe. And of them, we shall Diicourfe of the two first Kinds in this Chapter.

III. The Description. Our Common Green Beet

is almost like unto the White Beet, having a great long hard Root, of no uje after Seed time, from whence springs up many large Leaves lying upon the Ground of a green Colour, amid ft which rises up a large green Stalk crefted^ with some Branches and many Leaves thereon, almost up to the Top. The Flowers grow in long Tufts or Spikes, small at the ends and turning down their Heads, and yielding cornered Seed.

IV. Our Common White Beet has a long thick, great Root, and hard after bearing Seed, which endures all the Winter, and with its Leaves upon it, 'but perishing commonly the second Winter. From whence comes forth great broad Leaves, smooth and Plain, lying next the Ground\ these says Parkinson, grow in hot Countries to be three Foot long and very broad, and in our Country they are very large but nothing near that Proportion, and they are of a whitish green Colour. From this Root rises up a Stalk

great, strong, and Ribbed or Crefted, bearing great ft ore of Leaves upon it, almost up to the very top: the flowers groin along the Stalks in long tuft ted

Spikes small at their extremities, and bending down their Heads, and they clufter together in fhape like little Starrs which being past, there are small pale greenifl) yellow Burrs, yielding cornered, and uneven prickly Seed.

V. The Places. The Green Beet Parkinson lays has been found near the Salt Marines by Rochefter, in the Foot way going from the then Lady Levefons Houfe thither. The White Beet is said to grow Wild upon the Sea Coaft of Tenet, and divers other places by the Sea. They delight to grow in fat and moist Ground, but are chiefly nouriihed up with us in Gardens.

VI. The Times. They ought to be sown in the Spring : they flourish and are green all the Summer long, as also in Winter, and they Flower in the beginning of July, and the Seed is ripe in Au-

g"ft>

VII. The Qualities. They are Temperate in re-fpeO: to heat and Moisture and of a Nitrous Quality, Abfterfive, a little Diuretick, Opening, Cepha-lick, and Hepatick, Ptarmick, Alterative, and Alexi-phannick.

VIII. The Specification. They are found to be Specifick against Diseases of the Head and Brain.

IX. The Preparations. The Shops keep nothing thereof, but you may prepare therefrom, 1. A Liquid Juice. 2. An Inspissate Juice. 3. An Essence. 4. A Decoction. 5. An Errhine. 6. A Cataplasm.

The Virtues.

X. The Liquid Juice. It is Nitrous and cleanfing: being taken vj. or viij. Spoonfuls at a time, at going to Bed for some Nights, it opens the Obstructions of the Liver and Spleen,and is good against the Head Ach.

XL The Inspissate Juice, made with Vinegar into the thicknels of a Balsam, and apply'd to the Temples, prevails against the Inflammations of the Eyes, and mixed with Oil Olive, is good against Burnings and Scaldings.

XII. The Essence. It is good against the Yellow Jaundice, opens Obftru£tions both of Liver and Spleen, is good against the Vertigo, and the Bitings of any Venomous Creature. It is good against the Itch, the partsaffe£fed being bathed therewith, and cleanses the Head of DandrifY, dry ScurfT, Scabs, and heals fretting and running Sores, Ulcers and Herpes in the Head, Legs, or other Parts: it is also said to cure Baidness, and hinder the falling of the Hair. Dose 3. or 4. Spoonfuls or more.

XIII. The Decoction. If it is made with Equal parts of Water and Vinegar, it has all the Virtues of the Essence ·, besides it prevails against St. An-thonies Fire, and all other Inflammations in any Part.

XIV. The Errhine. It is made of the Liquid Juice iv. ounces, Niter half an ounce mixed and dijfolved. Being fnuft up the Noftrils it powerfully empties and cleanses the Head and Brain of superfluous Humors which cause the Apoplexy, Epilepsy, Vertigo, Megrim, Cephalalgia, Cephalara, Lethargy, Carus, and other like Distempers of those Parts ·, it also eases the Tooth Ach, and pains in the Ears, and being outwardly apply'd, has all the Virtues of the Essence and Decoction.

XV. The Cataplasm. Made of the boiled Herbs with or without the Addition of a little Niter and Alum, and apply'd, it is good against all sorts of Wheals, Putties, Boils, Biains, and other eruptions of the Skin, as also for Chilblains or Kibes whether on Hands or Feet, speedily Curing them.


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